Schizoaffective Disorder?…What is it?

Schizoaffective Disorder?…What is it?

hi psychology
so we know you’ve heard of schizophrenia
but have you ever heard of
schizoaffective disorder
or have you ever met anyone who lives
with schizoaffective disorder
it’s not surprising if you haven’t heard
of it as the national alliance on mental
illness NAMI
reports only 0.3 percent of the us
population
or 981 600 people will get it during
their lifetimes
before we begin it’s important to know
that we’re covering a mental illness
that can cause
serious consequences in the lives of the
people affected by it
this means we’ll briefly discuss
depression and suicide
which may be triggering to some viewers
with that said
let’s begin with what is schizoaffective
disorder
the diagnostic and statistical manual v
DSM-v
classifies schizoaffective disorder as a
psychotic disorder
with features of a mood disorder this
means in addition to the classic
symptoms of psychosis such as
hallucinations and delusions
the person who has schizoaffective
the disorder will also have symptoms of
major depressive disorder
bipolar disorder persistent depressive
disorder
cyclothymia or seasonal affective
disorder or sad
although the national center for
biotechnology information ncbi reported
50 percent of people diagnosed with
schizophrenia
also struggle with some form of
depression a diagnosis of
schizoaffective disorder means the
the person being diagnosed also
experiences at least one of the
following
hallucinations and delusions not caused
by drugs or a medical condition
for two or more weeks when they’re not
experiencing depression or mania
mood disorder symptoms usually
depression or mania
for the majority of the time when they are
experiencing psychosis
serious disorganized and catatonic
behavior that
isn’t caused by drugs or a medical
condition and negative symptoms
which are reduced emotional expression
or a lack of interest in reaching normal
goals
so what’s there to know about living
with schizoaffective disorder
one there are three phases of psychosis
psychosis or an impaired relationship
with the reality that involves
hallucinations
delusions loss of motivation and social
withdrawal
phase one prodrome these are the early
signs of psychosis
when someone is going through the
prodrome phase their life may start to
feel
a little uncomfortable or very disrupted
because this is the phase when they’ll
start to experience flashes of paranoia
problems concentrating depression
insomnia
anxiety and when they’ll start pulling
away from family and friends
phase two acute at this stage the person
with schizoaffective disorder will
experience the most disruptive
hallucinations
distressing delusions and confused
thinking the person suffering with
the schizoaffective disorder will feel
completely removed from reality during
the acute phase
which might look like a total fixation
on religion thinking others are out to
get them
having voices tell them they’re rotten
people talking to people or spirits that
aren’t there
or thinking angels or demons are calling
to them
they’re most likely to feel hopeless or
isolated from the ones they love
during this stage and phase three
recovery
this final stage is when the person
struggling with schizoaffective disorder
actually starts to see the light at the
end of the tunnel with the proper
intervention and treatment
many people who have a psychotic break
may never have another psychotic episode
in their lives
how having symptoms of a mood disorder
impacts living with psychosis
when you suffer from psychosis it can
feel like your head is in a haunted
house and you’re trapped inside with
dozens
of unpredictable ghosts most
schizoaffective disorder is different
from other psychotic disorders because
it means the individual living with it
also has the symptoms of a mood disorder
how does that change things the national
institute of health
NIH reports that schizoaffective
disorder creates extreme shifts in
behavior
mood and energy what type of shifts
depends on which of the two types of
schizoaffective disorders the person has
been diagnosed with
bipolar and depressive schizoaffective
disorder of bipolar type
presents with manic episodes and
depressive episodes
someone living with this type of
the schizoaffective disorder will experience
dramatic highs
or mania as well as episodes of deep
depression
signs of mania include increased energy
or hyperactivity
irritability increased grandeur insomnia
and reckless behavior this might present
as snapping at others
being unable to sit still believing one
is a supernatural figure or
famous and spending money that they
don’t have
during a manic phase the person
suffering is more vulnerable to delusion
and reckless behavior
which intensifies the effects of
psychosis
disorder depressive type presents a
psychosis
with depressive episodes but no mania
the depressive episodes often present
as feelings of hopelessness decreased
ability to function
low energy problems concentrating and
possibly decreased hygiene
the added challenge of mood disorder
symptoms make individuals living with
either type of schizoaffective disorder
more vulnerable to isolation due to
pushing others away with their mood
swings and deep depressions
this also means they’re more vulnerable
to substance abuse and suicidal thoughts
then the rest of the population
how living with schizoaffective disorder
affects your daily life
according to the department of veterans
affairs the negative behavioral symptoms
of schizoaffective disorder
such as feelings of apathy feeling
little or no pleasure in doing anything
also known as anhedonia or seeming to not
react to things
in their environment also known as
blunted effect
or difficulty paying attention creates
the most dramatic effects on the person
diagnosed with schizoaffective
disorder’s life
for example a girlfriend of someone with
schizoaffective disorder
may feel hurt or confused when her
partner doesn’t react with excitement
when they tell them about a recent
promotion at work
or the boss of someone who
the schizoaffective disorder might get
frustrated with their employee
for their constant tardiness or
disorganization
although the person struggling with
schizoaffective disorder probably
wants to be part of a healthy
relationship and most likely wants to be
productive
sometimes their symptoms make this
impossible this can lead to increased
feelings of not feeling good enough
loneliness and social isolation these
feelings can ultimately make depressive
episodes
worse living with schizoaffective
the disorder can be frustrating and
challenging
thankfully many people have successfully
managed the symptoms of this somewhat
rare disorder
the NCBI reported most people who
successfully manage their
schizoaffective symptoms
typically use a combination of life
skills training therapy and medications
did you find this video insightful if so
feel free to share it with someone who
would too
as always any information provided here
is for educational purposes only
if you need mental health counseling or
treatment please reach out to a mental
health professional.
keep watching the psych2go channel for more
information on mental illness and mental
health

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